1. ethiopienne:

    you can get wifi 35,000 feet in the air but racism is still a thing. ahh, human progress.

     

  2. Anonymous said: why are white people so sensitive

    lirkie:

    jean-luc-gohard:

    lirkie:

    jean-luc-gohard:

    daddysfallenangel-:

    We’re not the ones that still cry about slavery.

    That’s like if you shot someone and they were heated at you about it and you were like, “Hey, stop whining. I’m not crying about the shooting incident, so…”

    You dumb as shit, girl.

    seriously? no it’s more like if you hit someone and every day they poke the bruse to feel the pain and show the world that it is not okay to hit people. and five years later they say “i still feel the bruise” well it could’ve healed and you never hit anyone again. if people just learned how to say “okay that was stupid as shit let’s not do that again” and move the fuck on and not complain about something that COULD have gotten better, COULD have changed yet stay the same because of an inability to let the past be the past without repeating it over and over in an endless Spiral of Idiot. so fuck off, all of you. some of us learnt to let go and move the fuck on. it’s not like everyone in scandinavia hates each other even though we were slaves to other scandinavians. because we moved the fuck on.

    To learn from history doesn’t mean you have to keep seeing people as what your ancestors might’ve seen their ancestors as. it means you recognise what happened and you say “okay what can be done to fix this? and once fixed, what do we do now?” Casting down one because another feels down is a stupid idea and it never works.


    Also i would be grateful if americans could stop assuming everyone else acts like them. it’s not so much racial as it is american culture. 

    Are you fucking kidding me right now? First of all, don’t “oh it’s just Americans” me like Europe’s some enlightened bastion of tolerance and Zwartepiet doesn’t exist and France didn’t ban hijabs in ID photos and there’s not a whole lot of racism against Arabs and Roma and African immigrants, or like England never had “NO BLACKS, NO DOGS, NO IRISH” signs in their businesses.

    Second off, don’t you fucking dare act like black people are causing the scars left by slavery to ourselves. Let me give you a history lesson:

    In the 1400s, a then-obscure interpretation of the Curse of Ham biblical mythology started to take hold in Europe. The story is that Noah was passed out drunk and one of his sons looked at his dick too long while the other was covering him up. Noah cursed that son and all of his descendants to be slaves forever. This obscure interpretation was that God marked those descendants with dark skin, and that black people were thus destined by God to be slaves forever.

    This was used as justification to begin chattel slavery. This was different than the then-standard form of slavery because it wasn’t based on politics between tribes and nation-states, it wasn’t based on victory or defeat in battle or conquest of land, and there was basically no way out. You were born into it. Other slaves were treated as humans who were being forced to work rather than as livestock. Once this interpretation of the Bible became standard across Europe, black people were no longer seen as human.

    By the early 1600s, this was the dominant view. This continued to be the dominant view beyond the (official) end of slavery. But it wasn’t just a worldview. It shaped legal practices. Once slavery was over, the prisoner leasing system began.

    I encourage you to watch the free PBS documentary Slavery By Another Name, which explains in greater detail the prisoner leasing system, but I’ll provide a brief summary. After the Thirteenth Amendment was passed, slavery was illegal except as punishment for a crime. The South, whose economy was driven by slavery, needed that unpaid labor to maintain any sort of economic prosperity. So prisons started renting out prisoners to farmers. The demand was so high that police started arresting black people on trumped-up or invented charges so that they’d have slaves to lease to the plantations.

    Before this, black people were stereotyped as inherently docile, servile, loyal, and nonviolent. This stereotype was so deeply intrenched in our society that Confederate “scientist” Samuel A. Cartwright theorized that slaves who chose to run away did so because they were infected with a disease called “drapetomania.” One remnant of this stereotype that lasts today is the association of black people and watermelon—the idea at the time being that black people were so satisfied being slaves, all you’d need to do to keep them working forever is just give them a piece of watermelon to keep hydrated and refreshed in the summer sun. It should come as no surprise that this was the stereotype at the time. I mean, why would they trust their crops and their children and their food to people they thought were shady and violent?

    So many black people were arrested to fuel the prisoner leasing program that within ten years, the stereotype of black people became all of the negative things that it is today. And even though the direct leasing of prisoners in the way it was done back then has stopped, many companies still rely heavily on prisoner slave labor to minimize costs (for example, in the production of “artisanal” goat cheese).

    Between those two things, we have the establishment of the black race as an underclass. But of course, that’s not the end of the story. In 1898, in Wilmington, NC, then a mixed-race town, several black people were elected to public office. A conspiracy of local prominent white aristocrats—who, by the way, have parks and streets and monuments in that town today—overthrew the town’s government, burned the state’s only black newspaper to the ground, murdered a hundred or so black people (including children), and threw their bodies in the river. NC’s biggest newspaper (then and now) used this incident as proof that bad things happen when black people are allowed to take office, and the NC state legislature banned black people from holding office. That was the beginning of Jim Crow.

    From there, the South (and much of the North) became legally segregated. The US military didn’t integrate until WWII. There was no federal mandate to integrate schools until 1954. Segregation in businesses wasn’t outlawed until 1964, and it still took years for that to be enforced. Black people weren’t allowed to vote in most of the South until 1965. Interracial marriage wasn’t legal until 1967, and most Americans still thought it should be illegal until 1997. Boston schools weren’t integrated until 1976. Many areas of the South didn’t integrate schools until as late as 1991, and some still have segregated proms in 2014. And that’s without getting into things that are harder to quantify like representation in pop culture or issues with admissions and hiring or interpersonal issues. These are not things black people have chosen to have happen to us. These are things that happened and continue to happen as a result of chattel slavery all those years ago.

    We don’t exist in a vacuum. I wish we could erase all the lingering effects of slavery and segregation. If it was just a bruise being left alone on my arm, I would cut my own arm off before poking it. But it’s not. It’s something that we cannot escape and that has to be changed through action, not complacency. And fuck you for trying to act as though we had any part in making this happen.

    did i say you made it happen? i did not. i said poking the bruise in idle conversation.

    and it IS all american. i’ve seen the difference, and yes it USED TO for a short while to be really horrible some places but it simply isn’t as bad. no where is EVER perfect but we sure as fucking hell are better at being happy than you guys. half of us don’t even know what “race” we supposedly belong to. I’ve seen your blog (ofcause, i follow it) and you keep reblogging and making posts about how “white people” (what ever that’s supposed to mean) have it easy and their lives are a breeze and they never have to think about it, while in reality all you do it say “that’s not fair” and then grump about it. INSTEAD OF GETTING OFF YOUR STUPID ASS AND DOING SOMETHING and dont you dare say there’s nothing to be done or that you’re doing it already cause all you’re doing is dragging others down to everyone is level instead of pulling others up for the same result. it’s stupid and counter productive and all it EVER caused in history and in present is to make everyone angry at everyone (that and mass murder) AND NO i did not mean that “black people” are the cause of the pain. I meant that instead of fixing it, instead of working on it, all you do as a nation is to grump about it not working and put  bandage over a severed limb.  and then when you see someone who works for it an in fustrated that your nation doesnt, you lash out in anger, spilling pointless information that is only useful when you want to know “how did it happen?” but you never bother to ask “what are we doing wrong?” because you haven’t fixed it yet. 

    I dont care what race you biologically irrefutably belong to. and honestly i never understood how Racism can even exist amongst educated individuals, such as you, me or whoever. because it’s a biological thing that can’t be changed and we know it’s not that big of a deal and that each of the four major races has some characteristics that make it easier in specific places for each of us and some things become more difficult. but only by a hair. i certainly never understood or felt racism, only once or twice directed towards myself or mindless discussions such as this one with no point and even less influence on the actual situation. I wont change my stand on this because my stance is not influenced by races as it is influenced by the general assertion that large groups of people have a tendency to have the group mind of a three year old. however, i am a little disappointed and hurt that you would assume i was blaming some american negroids for being hurt over the things some american caucasoids did. no, that was completely on the caucasoids. 100% irrefutable. but i did say that instead of saying “yeah but we used to be enslaved by you” and saying and doing things, which are not as bad, but still hurtful and stupid. (“poking the bruise”) the long term solution would be to look that the current situation and change it in one swoop. (as much as possible) and then say “okay, let’s put the past behind us and not do it again.” But none of that was ever done because of the domino effect. if you don’t educate the people they aren’t gonna change as fastly. 


    and the reason racism isn’t as big in europe is because for the most part we see ourselves as nationalities, not races. sadly most of us don’t really know what races are, because we simply don’t need it as much.


    now, please dont be offended by any of that, cause macaroni knows it was not the intention. (i’m really sorry if it came across as offensive, I’m still young and I haven’t been able to practise discussing enough yet.)

    "A short while." ~1500-present is not "a short time." Even if you ignorantly mark the end of the problem as the time when schools were finished desegregating, that’s still ~1500-1991, which is not "a short while." Even if you mark it at the end of legal chattel slavery, ~1500-1865 is still not "a short while."

    You ignored the history lesson I so graciously gave you in favor of running off at the mouth about bootstrap morality and biological determinism, and you can miss me with that bullshit, child.

     
  3. blvck-zoid:

    Follow BLVCK-ZOID for fashion

    repcode 'blvckzoid' at Karmaloop for a discount

     

  4. jean-luc-gohard said: Any advice for a black man with a Latino last name trying to make it out here as a writer? I've been considering changing my last name so publications think I'm white and at least interview me or read my pieces, but I'm hoping there's a less drastic option out there.

    brianmichaelbendis:

    I’ve been thinking about your question all day… it really upset me.

     it upsets me that you even have to think that changing your name is the solution. I understand where that line of thought comes from but I don’t think it is the solution. I truly think you need to be who you are. I think the world needs every writer and artist to be who they are.

     I know there’s racism and sexism in this world, good Lord I know,  but I also know that I have never worked for a company that gave a crap about race or sex. all they care about is if they can sell what you’re making.

     I do believe there is subconscious and subtextual race and sex issues at work in the world but I think the only way to fight those issues is to not make them your issues. just push past them by being excellent at your craft. by being undeniable.

     please take myself for example. it took me a long time to “break-in” years and years. and every day that I was starving to death on Ramen noodles and every day that I saw no light at the end of the tunnel I made it an excuse to get better at my craft.

     It wasn’t because I am Jewish or I’m short that I wasn’t breaking in…  it was because it’s very hard to do. if it wasn’t hard everybody would be able to.  I said to myself: I must get better at my craft.

     because every one of my heroes had told me that if I worked on my craft that no matter what happened in my career I would, on the most important level, be happy.

     and when I did run into anti-Semitism, and I did, it fed me. it absolutely did not stop me. it completely psyched me up to push through.

     there are so many published and successful writers of every walk of life… there is someone out there for you to aspire to be. someone who proves that craft and ambition trump racism and sexism.

    the only way to break down all of this is to show up as yourself and craft your stories truthfully and honestly.

    I don’t know if I can be as optimistic as you, but I can’t help but be a little inspired by hearing you did go through tough times yourself on the way up. And it means a lot to me that you took the time to respond. My first feature screenplay, back when I was sixteen, was an original superhero script I wrote after binge-reading Ultimate Spider-Man and feeling inspired. And being half black and half Latino, I almost cried the first time I saw Miles Morales. And I dressed as him for Halloween in 2011.

    But anyway, thanks for doing what you do and for taking the time to reply, and hopefully you’ll be reading something I write on the MCU committee you mentioned on someone else’s question earlier.

     
  5. parskis:

    Okay, what the fuck?? Why is it that the protagonist of this movie is not the star of the poster?

    This movie is based on a book, which I’ve read, that is all about the journey of  the main character Hassan, from his home in India to England to France. From a child all the way to an old man. Helen Mirren plays Madame Mallory who is at first openly racist towards Hassan and his family but ends up mentoring him (yeah, I know..). She has a significant part in the story, but is in no way the main character. And the woman he is sharing the background with is his love interest for a little bit who is a very small part of the story that we barely get to know anything about all… Hassan is the main character. The entire book is narrated by him, about his journey, about his life. It’s not a love story. It’s not about Madame Mallory, though she’s a big component. I know books made into movies change things up, but…. There is no reason for Hassan to not be the focus of a story entirely about him? 

    I had a weird feeling about this book when I realized part-way through reading it was written by a white man, and saw the way he treated racism, so I guess I shouldn’t have expected better of the movie version, but this is still ridiculous.

     

  6. clintisiceman:

    The fact the a lot of white people (in fact, I suspect most white people) think that slavery is just something black people should “get over” blows my fucking mind. How does somebody even arrive at an opinion like that in the first place, and how stupid does one have to be to not immediately see why it’s wrong? It is such a fucking common opinion.

    It’s because they’ve never had to think about what it meant for the time after it and how we got to where we are today. Things have always been chill for white people in terms of race, so it’s something many of them just straight-up can’t imagine being an issue, even when presented evidence.

     

  7. (Source: iamdonald)

     

  8. I’ve only been twice but I liked it.

    (Source: dontcookbilly)

     
  9. blackfashion:

    H&M Grey Wool Suit x J.Crew Olive Sweater x Ralph Lauren Multi-Colored Socks x Olive Cole Haan Penny Loafers x Chaps by Ralph Lauren Elmhurst Business Briefcase

    Lamont Howard / 22 / Tallahassee, FL

    Submitted by: Lamont Howard (mrdelamont.tumblr.com)

    I don’t know if I would have gone with olive, and you definitely shouldn’t have a break like that if you’re wearing loafers, but the suit itself is so great. Just so great.

     

  10. Anonymous said: why are white people so sensitive

    lirkie:

    jean-luc-gohard:

    daddysfallenangel-:

    We’re not the ones that still cry about slavery.

    That’s like if you shot someone and they were heated at you about it and you were like, “Hey, stop whining. I’m not crying about the shooting incident, so…”

    You dumb as shit, girl.

    seriously? no it’s more like if you hit someone and every day they poke the bruse to feel the pain and show the world that it is not okay to hit people. and five years later they say “i still feel the bruise” well it could’ve healed and you never hit anyone again. if people just learned how to say “okay that was stupid as shit let’s not do that again” and move the fuck on and not complain about something that COULD have gotten better, COULD have changed yet stay the same because of an inability to let the past be the past without repeating it over and over in an endless Spiral of Idiot. so fuck off, all of you. some of us learnt to let go and move the fuck on. it’s not like everyone in scandinavia hates each other even though we were slaves to other scandinavians. because we moved the fuck on.

    To learn from history doesn’t mean you have to keep seeing people as what your ancestors might’ve seen their ancestors as. it means you recognise what happened and you say “okay what can be done to fix this? and once fixed, what do we do now?” Casting down one because another feels down is a stupid idea and it never works.


    Also i would be grateful if americans could stop assuming everyone else acts like them. it’s not so much racial as it is american culture. 

    Are you fucking kidding me right now? First of all, don’t “oh it’s just Americans” me like Europe’s some enlightened bastion of tolerance and Zwartepiet doesn’t exist and France didn’t ban hijabs in ID photos and there’s not a whole lot of racism against Arabs and Roma and African immigrants, or like England never had “NO BLACKS, NO DOGS, NO IRISH” signs in their businesses.

    Second off, don’t you fucking dare act like black people are causing the scars left by slavery to ourselves. Let me give you a history lesson:

    In the 1400s, a then-obscure interpretation of the Curse of Ham biblical mythology started to take hold in Europe. The story is that Noah was passed out drunk and one of his sons looked at his dick too long while the other was covering him up. Noah cursed that son and all of his descendants to be slaves forever. This obscure interpretation was that God marked those descendants with dark skin, and that black people were thus destined by God to be slaves forever.

    This was used as justification to begin chattel slavery. This was different than the then-standard form of slavery because it wasn’t based on politics between tribes and nation-states, it wasn’t based on victory or defeat in battle or conquest of land, and there was basically no way out. You were born into it. Other slaves were treated as humans who were being forced to work rather than as livestock. Once this interpretation of the Bible became standard across Europe, black people were no longer seen as human.

    By the early 1600s, this was the dominant view. This continued to be the dominant view beyond the (official) end of slavery. But it wasn’t just a worldview. It shaped legal practices. Once slavery was over, the prisoner leasing system began.

    I encourage you to watch the free PBS documentary Slavery By Another Name, which explains in greater detail the prisoner leasing system, but I’ll provide a brief summary. After the Thirteenth Amendment was passed, slavery was illegal except as punishment for a crime. The South, whose economy was driven by slavery, needed that unpaid labor to maintain any sort of economic prosperity. So prisons started renting out prisoners to farmers. The demand was so high that police started arresting black people on trumped-up or invented charges so that they’d have slaves to lease to the plantations.

    Before this, black people were stereotyped as inherently docile, servile, loyal, and nonviolent. This stereotype was so deeply intrenched in our society that Confederate “scientist” Samuel A. Cartwright theorized that slaves who chose to run away did so because they were infected with a disease called “drapetomania.” One remnant of this stereotype that lasts today is the association of black people and watermelon—the idea at the time being that black people were so satisfied being slaves, all you’d need to do to keep them working forever is just give them a piece of watermelon to keep hydrated and refreshed in the summer sun. It should come as no surprise that this was the stereotype at the time. I mean, why would they trust their crops and their children and their food to people they thought were shady and violent?

    So many black people were arrested to fuel the prisoner leasing program that within ten years, the stereotype of black people became all of the negative things that it is today. And even though the direct leasing of prisoners in the way it was done back then has stopped, many companies still rely heavily on prisoner slave labor to minimize costs (for example, in the production of “artisanal” goat cheese).

    Between those two things, we have the establishment of the black race as an underclass. But of course, that’s not the end of the story. In 1898, in Wilmington, NC, then a mixed-race town, several black people were elected to public office. A conspiracy of local prominent white aristocrats—who, by the way, have parks and streets and monuments in that town today—overthrew the town’s government, burned the state’s only black newspaper to the ground, murdered a hundred or so black people (including children), and threw their bodies in the river. NC’s biggest newspaper (then and now) used this incident as proof that bad things happen when black people are allowed to take office, and the NC state legislature banned black people from holding office. That was the beginning of Jim Crow.

    From there, the South (and much of the North) became legally segregated. The US military didn’t integrate until WWII. There was no federal mandate to integrate schools until 1954. Segregation in businesses wasn’t outlawed until 1964, and it still took years for that to be enforced. Black people weren’t allowed to vote in most of the South until 1965. Interracial marriage wasn’t legal until 1967, and most Americans still thought it should be illegal until 1997. Boston schools weren’t integrated until 1976. Many areas of the South didn’t integrate schools until as late as 1991, and some still have segregated proms in 2014. And that’s without getting into things that are harder to quantify like representation in pop culture or issues with admissions and hiring or interpersonal issues. These are not things black people have chosen to have happen to us. These are things that happened and continue to happen as a result of chattel slavery all those years ago.

    We don’t exist in a vacuum. I wish we could erase all the lingering effects of slavery and segregation. If it was just a bruise being left alone on my arm, I would cut my own arm off before poking it. But it’s not. It’s something that we cannot escape and that has to be changed through action, not complacency. And fuck you for trying to act as though we had any part in making this happen.